Image for post
Image for post

It’s all a miracle. All of it, from the infinitesimally small probability of our existence to the families we are born into, environment, chance, and serendipity. And so we float through the world in awe, struggle or blissful oblivion in the name of the miraculous — the human experience of transcendence we call life.

The miraculous was always within reach for me. I didn’t grow up with fairies or elves, but I never had to be convinced, changed or talked into any of it. My great-grandmother, Valasia, healed people with a special form of prayer. I will never forget her serious demeanor as she drew fire crosses with matches over a bowl of water and prayed semi-silently in Greek until the oil droplets she landed onto the water, told her it was done. There were always people coming in and out seeking healing, and it was all done for free. Although there were many rules around its secrecy — there were covenants and conditions too — I grew up witnessing miracles, while feeling an intense desire to find out how these things worked. The placebo effect could not describe how infants were healed, for example. It’s not like two-month olds experienced the biology of belief and yet, Valasia healed babies all the time. Quantum entanglement? Energy transfer? I saw Star Wars when I was in the seventh grade. I was in awe. …


Image for post
Image for post

I haven’t had a headache since 2010. Yes, it’s been a decade. Before that I was on 800 mg of Motrin and my stomach was bleeding, as I was over-medicating in hopes to stop the pain. And the pain was still there, in the background, like an annoying sharp jabber that was stealing my sanity, my joy, my life.

I thought I would have to live with these awful migraines forever.

Will never forget the day I went to ER. They agreed to see me because I was hitting my head so hard that my scalp had a self-inflicted bruise. The nurse looked at me like I was a pathetic psychopath. I did this because each time I hit myself, the pain from the hit displaced the high-pitched, sharp migraine shrill for a second. The respite didn’t last, so I kept hitting myself. Sad and desperate. If you have never suffered from migraines, you will not be able to relate. …


Image for post
Image for post
Photo Credit: https://www.pexels.com/@olly

Many people feel anxious these days. No one will judge you for worrying about the future in these troubling times.

When do you know normal worry has turned into anxiety? How is anxiety diagnosed and why do we not test for neurotransmitter imbalances through a lab test, not a questionnaire?

All valid questions, and we can test for amino acid imbalances, specifically for those that play a vital role in anxiety — the inhibitory ones that calm the mind, and the excitatory ones — those that keep us awake, wired, and restless. You get the idea, but another article will have to be written on that subject. …


Image for post
Image for post
Photo Credit: https://www.pexels.com/@moh-adbelghaffar

The heartbreak that comes with having a smart child that gets terrible grades due to refusal to get organized to do work is hard to overcome.

I will begin with sharing a story. Can you relate to any of this? If you can, and feel that your child has ODD, take the quiz at the end of the story. Please understand that these types of kids are often highly intelligent, strong, independent, and self-sufficient. Many of them become amazing achievers.

“All the signs were there since she was a toddler. The defiance started at the age of 3. The medical literature says that ODD manifests around 8, but for many the signs are there since early childhood. We were constantly working on “breaking her.” She refused to follow directions. Her daycare teacher repeatedly brought up her defiance. No anger, just complete lack of cooperation. She told us how intelligent she was and how amazing her vocabulary was. She spoke with awe at times, and we could all see it. This kid was speaking full sentences before she could walk. …


Image for post
Image for post
Photo Credit: https://www.pexels.com/@ketut-subiyanto

Estrogen may play an important role in sleep, but progesterone holds a special significance. A steroid hormone produced in the ovaries of non-menopausal women, by a temporary gland formed at ovulation, progesterone is also secreted by the adrenal glands of both men and women. Progesterone is always naturally produced. Progestin is a synthetic form of it, marketed as Drospirenone, Levonorgestrel, or Medroxyprogesterone.

Progesterone is a precursor to GABA, a calming neurotransmitter that reduces neuron activity, thus soothing the brain. GABA controls fear and anxiety, as it steps in to soothe over-excitement as needed. It plays an important role in behavior, cognition, and the body’s response to stress. …


Image for post
Image for post
Photo Credit: https://www.pexels.com/@skitterphoto

If you have acquired sensitivity to the estrogen that circulates in your blood, you may experience melasma — dark spots on the face and body. The chances of that happening increase with hormone treatments for fertility, HRT, or birth control. Other risk factors include estrogen blockers and seizure medications.

Licorice root extract has been used in beauty products for millennia. It acts a tyrosinase inhibitor that prevents melanocytes from pigmenting your skin. It’s a natural skin brightener.

Other amazing titles believed to be a part of its medicinal arsenal include:

  • hormone balancer,
  • mood enhancer,
  • heartburn soother,
  • immune system booster,
  • heart disease…

Image for post
Image for post
Photo Credit: https://www.pexels.com/@olly

Some conditions do not respond to naturopathy, while others become resolved with ease. Natural medicine, like chronic disease management, is for life. Fortunately, it involves a great diet, therapy and herbs — salubrious self-care we all need. Crohn’s responds exceptionally well to it.

The Diet

Begin with testing for food sensitives and nutritional deficiencies. Adjust your diet accordingly, within Pollan’s tenet:

  1. Eat real foods.
  2. Mostly plants.
  3. Not too much.

For the most part, eat foods prepared with the help of water — avoid frying, sauteing, air-frying and baking.

Do an Elimination Diet

The Elimination Diet is a diagnostic eating plan, during which foods are excluded, then added back in intervals of time. It is designed to identify foods that cause adverse effects, such as food allergies and food intolerances. …


Image for post
Image for post
Photo Credit: https://www.pexels.com/@valeriya

A forgotten mineral is finally getting some attention as more and more people are testing deficient. Why is this important? Because deficiency leads to diabetes and atherosclerosis, two ubiquitous conditions widely and steadily on the rise. The US in fact, tops the list of deficiency concentrations due to processed foods, leaky gut, medications, drug use, and alcoholism.

Chromium Controls Your Mood

Chromium is an essential mineral found in whole grains, mushrooms, and brewer’s yeast. It controls mood because of its action on insulin, the hormone that controls blood sugar levels. The relationship between mood and blood-sugar is well established in the medical literature. Glycemic highs and lows contribute to anxiety and depression. …


Image for post
Image for post

No matter how much we try to avoid the inevitable, as we age our estrogen levels will decline. This will lead to thinning bones and possible weight gain to prepare our bodies for the impending bone density loss. It will also do a number on our hair, nails and skin, all of which may become drier, less shiny, more fragile, less elastic, drab, and dull.

Your hormones are the chemical messengers that connect your glands, organs and tissues. Produced by your glands and organs, they have an effect on all of your tissues.

Declining estrogen leads to sagging skin, thinning hair, fine lines and wrinkles. We know this. We see it too. The areas around the lips, cheeks and neck will droop first. The skin around the eyes may also seem lifeless because of decreased blood flow. …


Image for post
Image for post

You can spend a small fortune on facials, Botox and fillers only to arrive at the elusive conclusion that hormonal health and rest are key to a youthful, hydrated, beautiful skin.

It’s common knowledge that high levels of thyroid hormones can cause a warm, sweaty, and flushed skin. Underactive thyroid functioning can lead to dry, coarse thickening of the skin with reduced ability to sweat.

To help your skin retain a healthy oil barrier, be sure to consume essential fatty acids like the Omega-3s found in flaxseed oil, wild salmon, walnuts and eggs. These have been found to aid both underactive and overactive thyroid functioning. …

About

Evelina Sodt, PhD

Dr. Sodt is not an MD. Nothing on this page intends to treat, diagnose or prevent disease. Check me out at www.tinyurl.com/EvelinaSodt

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store